Some issues and challenges associated with 3D printing

By Bharadwaj Jaishankar and Gaurang Gautam, Saikrishna & Associates
0
3001
LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter
Whatsapp
Telegram
Copy link

With a constant and dynamic advancement in technology, laws, especially intellectual property laws, are always playing catch-up. This results in IP laws being stretched and sought to be purposively interpreted to cater to the advancement of technology. One such technology growing at an amazing rate, 3D printing, has thrown up interesting IP issues.

Bharadwaj Jaishankar
Bharadwaj Jaishankar

Involving a process of complex layering, 3D printers print three-dimensional tangible objects easily generated through a computer-aided design (CAD). The resultant product can be complex in design and, in some cases, complete with moving parts as well.

This advancement has created a scenario where manufacturing of any product can be highly localized, presenting IP owners with the prospect of high quality infringement of various IP rights.

You must be a subscribersubscribersubscribersubscriber to read this content, please subscribesubscribesubscribesubscribe today.

For group subscribers, please click here to access.
Interested in group subscription? Please contact us.

你需要登录去解锁本文内容。欢迎注册账号。如果想阅读月刊所有文章,欢迎成为我们的订阅会员成为我们的订阅会员

已有集团订阅,可点击此处继续浏览。
如对集团订阅感兴趣,请联络我们

Bharadwaj Jaishankar is a senior associate at Saikrishna & Associates, where Gaurang Gautam is an associate. The views expressed in this article are personal.

Saikrishna_&_Associates_logo

A-2E, CMA Tower, 2nd Floor

Sector -24, NOIDA – 201301

National Capital Region, India

Tel: +91 120 4633900 (100 Lines)

Fax: +91 120 4633999

Email: bharadwaj@saikrishnaassociates.com

gaurang@saikrishnaassociates.com

LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter
Whatsapp
Telegram
Copy link